Meniere's disease steroid injection treatment

Section (cutting) of the vestibular nerve may be advised when hearing is good in the involved ear. The operation is performed under general anesthesia and usually requires 4-7 days of hospitalization. Through an incision behind the ear, a portion of the mastoid bone is removed and the balance nerve is cut. In the majority of cases, the hearing remains the same after surgery. In some cases, the hearing is temporarily reduced for several weeks after surgery. The symptom of vertigo is eliminated in approximately 95 - 98% of cases. Persistent unsteadiness, however, may continue for weeks or months until the opposite ear stabilizes the balance system.

The injections are performed with the patient lying down and using the office microscope. The ear is first cleaned of wax. A small area of the eardrum is numbed with a drop of medication. A small needle and syringe are then used and the needle is passed through the eardrum at the site that is numbed so that the tip is in the ear, near the round window. This is a membrane where drugs are absorbed in to the cochlea. The fluid is injected in to the middle ear and the patient stays lying down for 20-30 minutes during which he does not swallow or sniff. The drug sits against the round window and is absorbed in to the inner ear. The patient then sits up slowly and leaves the office. Patients should not drive for a few hours after this procedure. Water is kept out of the ear until it is confirmed that the tiny hole has healed.

For more severe disease, oral corticosteroids may be necessary to reduce the inflammatory response. When large amounts of steroids are required or if the disease is severe and is not responding to steroid therapy, other immunosuppressive medications often are recommended. These immunosuppressive drugs include methotrexate , cyclophosphamide , cyclosporine or azathioprine . In some cases, combinations of these medicines are prescribed. Occasionally, if the disease has damaged blood vessels, cochlear implantation may need to be done to correct the problem.

hearing loss (may be asymmetric) with or without dizziness, aural fullness or tinnitus. Symptoms often progress over weeks to months although sudden hearing loss has been Occasionally, the patient may have a systemic immune disease such as rheumatoid ,65,66 Hughes65 examined 52 patients suspected of having autoimmune inner ear disease and found 7 to have Cogan's syndrome, 4 with rheumatoid arthritis and 1 having systemic lupus Cogan's syndrome is a rare disease characterized by non-syphilitic interstitial keratitis associated with tinnitus, vertigo and hearing The etiology is uncertain but evidence suggests that immunologic or infectious causes are

Meniere's disease steroid injection treatment

meniere's disease steroid injection treatment

hearing loss (may be asymmetric) with or without dizziness, aural fullness or tinnitus. Symptoms often progress over weeks to months although sudden hearing loss has been Occasionally, the patient may have a systemic immune disease such as rheumatoid ,65,66 Hughes65 examined 52 patients suspected of having autoimmune inner ear disease and found 7 to have Cogan's syndrome, 4 with rheumatoid arthritis and 1 having systemic lupus Cogan's syndrome is a rare disease characterized by non-syphilitic interstitial keratitis associated with tinnitus, vertigo and hearing The etiology is uncertain but evidence suggests that immunologic or infectious causes are

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