Atopic eczema steroid cream

Some people have frequent flare-ups of eczema. For example, a flare-up may subside well with topical steroid therapy. But then, within a few weeks, a flare-up returns. In this situation, one option that might help is to apply steroid cream on the usual sites of flare-ups for two days every week. This is often called weekend therapy. This aims to prevent a flare-up from occurring. In the long run, it can mean that the total amount of topical steroid used is less than if each flare-up were treated as and when it occurred. You may wish to discuss this option with your doctor.

A skin biopsy (a sample of a small piece of skin that is sent to the lab for examination under the microscope) is rarely helpful to establish the diagnosis. Many patients with severe atopic disease may have elevated numbers of a certain type of white blood cells (eosinophils) and/or elevated serum IgE level. These tests can support the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. Additionally, skin swab (long cotton tip applicator or Q-tip) samples may be sent to the lab to exclude staphylococcal infections of the skin, which may complicate atopic dermatitis.

A more novel form of treatment involves exposure to broad or narrow-band ultraviolet (UV) light. UV radiation exposure has been found to have a localized immunomodulatory effect on affected tissues and may be used to decrease the severity and frequency of flares. [44] [45] In particular, the usage of UVA1 is more effective in treating acute flares, whereas narrow-band UVB is more effective in long-term management scenarios. [46] However, UV radiation has also been implicated in various types of skin cancer, and thus UV treatment is not without risk. [47]

Atopic eczema steroid cream

atopic eczema steroid cream

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